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A Picture is Worth…

By Daniel Edwins on September 10, 2012

Let’s talk about words for a moment.

Now, I’m a writer by trade. I like words. I’m really good with a keyboard (wanna compare WPM?). I write haikus for fun. But I’m here today to advocate for the use of fewer – yes, fewer – words.

I recently put together a quick set of guidelines for a client’s social media strategy. I’ll spare you all the details, but at its core was a broad reminder to show, don’t tell. From Facebook to Google+ to (the obvious ones) Pinterest and Instagram, social media users want imagery, not words. (Heck, Twitter forces you to keep it short.) So get creative. Keep the “face” in Facebook. Think videos, illustrations and pictures. But go light on the words.

This concept has a broader application. As a writer, it’s tempting to fill every brochure, website, print ad, flyer and direct mailer with words, glorious words! But the fact is that – no matter how engagingly I might write – what attracts attention and gets results is striking imagery. Create a feeling, set a mood, convey an emotion … but do it with fewer words, not more.

Of course some audiences demand more details or specifics than others. But save the thick, wordy content for a deeper review; don’t force it to the surface. Set the hook today and deliver the dense details once you’ve hauled your audience into the boat.

What they say is true: a picture is truly worth 990 words. (Think I’m going to admit that a picture is worth 1,000 words? Wrong. I’m a writer, remember?)

About Daniel

Daniel joined Neuger Communications Group in 2008. He is an experienced web designer and developer with a passion for creating functional and user-centered custom websites and mobile apps. He enjoys creating and employing websites and other technology-based solutions to help clients meet their goals. Daniel is a friendly guide for our web development clients, effortlessly translating tech-speak into language they can understand. Read More »

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